humanrightswatch:

Louisiana Taking Away Medicaid Lifeline for Disabled, Other Vulnerable Residents
Two years ago, Donna Risso and her friend Michael were living under a bridge in New Orleans. They were struggling not only with homelessness, but also with Donna’s mounting health problems, which included hepatitis C, cirrhosis of the liver, encephalitis, pancreatitis and chronic anemia. Donna was a “frequent flyer” at the emergency room, often five to 10 times a month, but her health was getting steadily worse.
Social workers using federal and state resources helped Donna find housing and got her on a state program called “disability Medicaid,” which covers health care costs for people who meet federal disability criteria but are not yet on the federal program. This important initiative, common in many states, is a bridge to health services for people applying for federal benefits, which can take years.
Although the program was a lifesaver for Donna, Gov. Bobby Jindal terminated “disability Medicaid” in Louisiana as of Jan. 1, leaving 9,200 people across the state with no coverage.
Read more.
Photo: An outreach team from Unity Of Greater New Orleans counsels a homeless man on housing options, January 2011. © 2011 AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

humanrightswatch:

Louisiana Taking Away Medicaid Lifeline for Disabled, Other Vulnerable Residents

Two years ago, Donna Risso and her friend Michael were living under a bridge in New Orleans. They were struggling not only with homelessness, but also with Donna’s mounting health problems, which included hepatitis C, cirrhosis of the liver, encephalitis, pancreatitis and chronic anemia. Donna was a “frequent flyer” at the emergency room, often five to 10 times a month, but her health was getting steadily worse.

Social workers using federal and state resources helped Donna find housing and got her on a state program called “disability Medicaid,” which covers health care costs for people who meet federal disability criteria but are not yet on the federal program. This important initiative, common in many states, is a bridge to health services for people applying for federal benefits, which can take years.

Although the program was a lifesaver for Donna, Gov. Bobby Jindal terminated “disability Medicaid” in Louisiana as of Jan. 1, leaving 9,200 people across the state with no coverage.

Read more.

Photo: An outreach team from Unity Of Greater New Orleans counsels a homeless man on housing options, January 2011. © 2011 AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

Reblogged from

She is not “my girl.”

She belongs to herself. And I am blessed, for with all her freedom, she still comes back to me, moment-to-moment, day-by-day, and night-by-night.

How much more blessed can I be?

Avraham Chaim, Thoughts after The Alchemist (via petitedino)

I must appreciate exactly like this

(via mrdaydreamm)

Reblogged from dreaming
benchandcompass:

if it was easy to get to, everyone would go.

benchandcompass:

if it was easy to get to, everyone would go.

Are you becoming more sweet-spirited, more like Jesus? Are you looking soberly in the mirror each day and praying, ‘Lord, I want to conform to Your image in every area of my life’? Or has your bitterness taken root, turning into rebellion and hardness of heart? Have you learned to shield yourself from the convicting voice of God’s Spirit?
— David Wilkerson (via kvtes)
Reblogged from {lux et amor}
Reblogged from Cold Wind & Iron
Be mindful of what you put in your body; in your mind. We not only consume the food that we eat, but also the thoughts, images, and energy we surround ourselves with. Choose wisely.
— The Blissful Blog (Katie)
Reblogged from Think North
Reblogged from Simply Put.
brotherstories:

Work. Not complaining.

brotherstories:

Work. Not complaining.

Reblogged from Brother Stories
And it has been
one hell
of a year.
I have worn
the seasons
under my sleeves,
on my thighs,
running down my cheeks.
This is what
surviving
looks like, my dear.
Michelle K., It Has Been One Hell of a Year.  (via coyotegold)
Reblogged from Whatever forever
antolovich:

thepandabaker:

adeyami:

Land of the free home of the rich

What really scares me is that they all have significantly cheaper health care AND education, which means Americans not only make they least, they pay the most.

…wait, what?

antolovich:

thepandabaker:

adeyami:

Land of the free home of the rich

What really scares me is that they all have significantly cheaper health care AND education, which means Americans not only make they least, they pay the most.

…wait, what?

7while23:

Laurence Demaison, Meditations, 2013
Reblogged from
Reblogged from Wood Is Good!
boooomting:

dichotomized:

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to enter and complete the Boston Marathon as a numbered entry. She registered under the gender-neutral name of “K.V. Switzer”. After realizing that a woman was running, race organizer Jock Semple went after Switzer shouting, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” however, Switzer’s boyfriend and other male runners provided a protective shield during the entire Marathon. These photographs taken of the incident made world headlines.

Will never not reblog this

boooomting:

dichotomized:

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to enter and complete the Boston Marathon as a numbered entry. She registered under the gender-neutral name of “K.V. Switzer”. After realizing that a woman was running, race organizer Jock Semple went after Switzer shouting, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” however, Switzer’s boyfriend and other male runners provided a protective shield during the entire Marathon. These photographs taken of the incident made world headlines.

Will never not reblog this